Why do I blog?

Over the past week or two, I have reflected on why I blog and what it does for me after I saw a bunch of tweets from Chris Robinson (@absvalteaching) and Kate Nowak (@k8nowak).  This leads into my response to Kate’s request to MTBoS…

1. What hooked you on reading the blogs? Was it a particular post or person? Was it an initiative by the nice MTBoS folks? A colleague in your building got you into it? Desperation?
Thinking/Intellectual Stimulation.  I wanted to have intellectual stimulation and did not have people in my school that were stretching my thinking pedagogically and mathematically. I interviewed a math teacher candidate that mentioned that I should check out Dan Meyer.  I jumped down the rabbit hole of ideas and resources in his blog and got hooked.
2. What keeps you coming back? What’s the biggest thing you get out of reading and/or commenting?
Resources.  I started bouncing from Dan Meyer’s blog to Fawn Nguyen’s to David Wee’s.  The online interaction improves my teaching and makes me want to get better and the resources make me better. Without it, I would get bored.
3. If you write, why do you write? What’s the biggest thing you get out of it?
This past spring, I started lurking on twitter.  Slowly, I started commenting on other’s blogs and got up the nerve to start my own.  I started by created a library of resources on my blog and decided to do a 180 blog on my first year of teaching Geometry.  As of yesterday, I have decided to stop the 180 blog.  This was not based on workload or interest, but more of the fact that in my first year of teaching Geometry I can clearly see the first big steps I must make to improve my teaching in the topic.  I will discontinue what I consider primarily blithering babble and will blog when I want some ideas so that the few that are willing provide input do.  The biggest thing I get is great interactions.
4. If you chose to enter a room where I was going to talk about blogging for an hour (or however long you could stand it), what would you hope to be hearing from me? MTBoS cheerleading and/or tourism? How-to’s? Stories?
The biggest thing I would want to get is how to build a network of people that will interact and provide input on my work as I do on theirs.  MTBoS is a great group and I enjoy reaching out to it.  The challenge is that it seems like many of the MTBoS relationships are forged through many years of working together online and at conferences.  I have to say that I do get solid responses from those I reach out to if the response is simple.  Deeper responses require more time and more thought are tougher to get responses because I believe that everyone has bandwidth limitations.
If you were standing in a room, I would like to hear how to build a math social network by effectively using twitter to support a blog to support an internet persona that connects with other math teaching professionals.
Advertisements

2 thoughts on “Why do I blog?

  1. “The biggest thing I would want to get is how to build a network of people that will interact and provide input on my work as I do on theirs. MTBoS is a great group and I enjoy reaching out to it. The challenge is that it seems like many of the MTBoS relationships are forged through many years of working together online and at conferences. I have to say that I do get solid responses from those I reach out to if the response is simple. Deeper responses require more time and more thought are tougher to get responses because I believe that everyone has bandwidth limitations.”

    Yeah. That’s tough. I think when I started there were probably less than ten people writing regularly, so it was pretty easy to make connections. But I’d say the best way to get attention (i.e. people’s “bandwidth”) is to be generous with your best stuff. Write up some killer lessons (or review games, or assessment setups, or whatever is your thing you do really well) and include all the media and documents people will need to thoroughly evaluate them and try them out if they wish. There probably aren’t any real shortcuts to years of working together, but if you think about people who sort of burst on the scene and inspired lots of people to notice and interact with them, it’s those like Fawn whose work is both really strong and helpfully and clearly presented.

  2. Thanks for the advice. I will take it and go down that road. I tossed out the idea because I suspect others like myself are looking for ideas like the one you just shared when you present at NCTM.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s